TIP:  Leaders Give Credit to Others by Fern Weis

Updated: Jan 14, 2019



TIP:  Leaders Give Credit to Others by Fern Weis, Ridgewood Moms

Do you want your kids to be able to make friends, influence people and be seen as a leader? One of the qualities of a respected friend, influencer and leader is the ability to give others credit when it is due. Is this something you are able to do? Do you model it in your own family or on the job?

President Ronald Reagan said, "It's amazing what you can accomplish if you don't care who claims the credit." He was talking about politics and government, but it certainly applies to all of us, adults and kids, in personal and business relationships.

Being an effective parent, manager, chairperson or team leader is generally not something you can do on your own. The success of any group (including the family) depends upon all its members. Everyone wants to be acknowledged for their effort and contribution. Whether it's something they've done ("Well-written report for the staff, Joe.") or something they've refrained from doing ("Susie, I know you had something to tell me, and I appreciate that you waited patiently until I was done.") you'll earn points and loyalty for giving credit to others.

But you'd like some recognition, right? It's normal to want it. It feels good and is a real boost to the ego. It will usually come your way, but the point is not to insist on it. (Think about it this way: if everyone followed this practice, they'd be acknowledging your efforts, too.)


Fern Weis is a parent coach, specializing in supporting parents of teens and young adults who are going through difficult situations (including underachieving, disrespectful behavior, addiction recovery and more). With parent-centered coaching, Fern helps parents release guilt, end enabling, and confidently prepare their children to thrive through life’s challenges. Learn more about coaching and workshops at www.fernweis.com. And while you’re there, download a free report, “Five Powerful Steps to Get Your Teen to Talk.”

#ParentCoaching