Getting Into Spring by The Nature Place



I look at the big calendar in our office, at March 20th, to be exact, and read two words that make my heart sing: “Spring Begins”.

After the winter we have had, there could not be two more beautiful words put together than these. Say them out loud, but softly. I know that has to feel good. I also know that there are crocuses and snow drops somewhere under the foot of snow that seems to have been on the ground for more than a month. The tapped maple trees are only now dripping.

Some warmer temperatures are hinting that, soon, I may not have to put my long johns on every morning. Drip – drip – drip the icicles are melting. The ice dams in my gutters will need quite a bit more time. And the mountains of pushed/plowed snow in the mall parking lots!? Maybe we can plan a climbing experience on them for our oldest groups this summer.

If words can make our heart all-aflutter, just imagine what getting outside, into spring, can do!

  • Take a walk and search for patches or peeks of green.

  • Say “welcome back” to the first flock of robins you see on a lawn. Clap and applaud for them.

  • At noon, turn sideways to the sun and enjoy the soothing warmth on your cheek. Now do a 180 and let the sunlight fall on the other cheek. Ahh…

  • Look at the ground for designs, patterns in parking lots, created by the alchemy of snow, ice, puddles, salt, warming temperatures.

  • Just stop and smell the warming air.

  • Go out at 7 am or earlier and listen to the very beginnings – like warming up/practicing – of a soon-to-be grand avian orchestra.

  • Choose to befriend a few buds on a low enough branch so kids can see and check on them every few days. Tie a piece of yarn or string on the branch where your buds are so you can easily find them again. In fact, make ‘buddies’ from different trees.

  • Plan a small garden, it could even be in a pot. Stores are displaying their seeds already.

~Ed Bieber is the Owner/Director of The Nature Place Day Camp. He has a B.A. degree from Rutgers University in Botany, M.S. from Michigan State University in Outdoor Education and New York State Permanent Teaching Certification, N-6. Ed has worked professionally, since 1970, with over 250,000 children (and still counting!), adults and families in the outdoors.

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