The Good Habits Guide To Taking Back Your Time by Randi Levin

Updated: Jan 14, 2019



Habits. We all have them. Some of them work for us and some of them just simply get in our way. To make the good ones stick and to pivot on the ones we want to change we need to reposition our relationship with the time in our lives. Mastering the time in your day begins one good habit at a time. It all starts with consistency. It all begins with YOU. You need to be at the core of your own daily to-do. Here are my top 10 suggestions for making each day work for you one habit at a time! What can you do now with the time you do have?

  1. Design space for you. Downplay tech time, interruptions and procrastination in favor of human time! Create time to recharge by adding non multi-task oriented playtime into your daily life. Run, walk, bike, exercise, read, nap, and take a class, daydream, paint, or color. Do something you love that brings you joy and brings out the joy in each day.

  2. Balance. It is all about letting go of perfect and leaning into what is next. Balance in life is a fluid movement and rhythm that changes and pivots with you. Make it a habit to periodically realign your tasks and make sure that they are in sync with what your priorities are TODAY. If you have lost weight, changed jobs, or are in a new relationship but you are still dancing around the same tasks and habits you had previously, there is going to be upheaval and confusion because your overall balance needs to shift as you do. It is never “done” and should be consistently in motion.

  3. Focus on priorities over perfection. Perfection can hold us back and create frustration over what is not yet accomplished. When we invest rather than manage our time, we are more apt to experience the quality in our lives over the quantity of time we spend on things.

  4. Create an 8th day of the week! Scheduling time to have nothing to schedule several days a week, creates a mental 8th day!

  5. Make a bucket list of successes that you desire in 1-5 years. Dreaming creates a vision and if we can see ourselves doing something…we tend to do it! Dreaming makes us feel as though we are going someplace. Start. Go.

  6. Arrive early to meetings. This cultivates a sense of calm and readiness. Being late makes a statement. It screams “not prepared” or “overwhelmed.” If you cannot manage your own time, how can you manage important tasks and business responsibilities?

  7. Go to bed early and wake up early. Find the sweet spot in your day. If you are a late day person, focus your biggest tasks for that time. Work with rather than against your natural body rhythms.

  8. Make a list of waiting time activities, which may also include down time activities. Do them when you have open gaps in your schedule. Make “time available” actively work for you.

  9. Do your to-do list the night before. Highlight 3 successes from today and 3-5 things for tomorrow. You will sleep better and wake up ready to go with purpose.

  10. Simply say “no.” That way you can hold space for saying, “yes” to what matters most.


Randi Levin, CPC, CEO & Founder Randi Levin Coaching-- is a certified transitional life strategist, inspirational speaker, thought leader, and reinvention expert. Randi is the author of Recoloring Life Workshops as featured in The Wall Street Journal. She holds a BS Degree in Journalism from The University of Maryland and a professional coaching certification from The Institute of Professional Excellence in Coaching.

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