Play By The Rules: Lose The Rules So You Can PLAY by Randi Levin



As adults, we spend decades perfecting the fine art form of being a grown-up. It is a role we slowly embrace, into and out of our college years, and then build toward for the remainder of our lives. It could be argued that certain people we know never really grew up or still need to, but for the most part, by the time we are parents ourselves, we’ve got that grown-up thing down to a science.

Is playing by the adult rules really working?

Playing by the grown-up rules strips us of being creative and curious. Grown-up rules emphasize set agendas, defined goals, time management skills and consequences. Grown-up rules keep us status quo because they favor conforming to a set way to proceed with our lives. I would argue that conversely, breaking free of our traditional adult mentalities every once in awhile can allow us to get in touch with the unconventional and more expressive and thought provoking sides of ourselves. I am not suggesting that we revert to our childhoods, only that we are open to the idea that asking questions, learning, exploring and being curious should not only belong to childhood.

Why?

It is fascinating to watch children play. They know no boundaries. They take on different roles, they allow themselves to be vulnerable, to explore. Children ask “Why?” How often in our adult worlds do we allow ourselves to try on different hats, to laugh at ourselves, to blur the lines between dreams and reality? Being an explorer is synonymous with being able to accept the unknown in favor of learning about something new, maybe even something better. Children are fearless. They view the world differently, partially because they have not lived in it long enough but also because they can see the opportunities in everything they do. They don’t stop to calculate if they can do something or be something when they are playing, they just live in the moment and play it out.

Plan a “time out!”

Creating a small window of opportunity to explore in an inquisitive way allows us to take a break from the ordinary and connect to our more imaginative and intuitive sides. Without a structured plan in place all day, every day, we can break free of some of our needs to control and also of the fears that can hold us in place. Taking a respite from being inside our adult heads can open up a world of possibilities toward reshaping how we tackle our jobs, our relationships and our personal lives as a whole. Think of playing in the sandbox as a twenty-minute “yoga for our heads.” Losing some of our adult rules for a few minutes a day is actually a great way to dig deeper into discovering what has the most meaning to us. It frees us to think about that which we often do not. The renewal and recharge in allowing ourselves periodically to think like a child offers us a refreshing “time out” and an opportunity to gain a fresh perspective on what may be most important to us now.

Explore. Ask. Be Vulnerable. Play!

~ Randi Levin, Certified Transitional Coach, mentor, writer and inspirational speaker, partners with her clients to define and navigate the many “acts or chapters” of their lives. She is a subject matter expert in the art of reinvention and it is her joy to unleash her client’s unlimited potential and to tap into what she calls, “the evolving business of you.” Contact RandiCLevin@gmail.com or 347-395-6255.

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